Carew Castle and Tide Mill

Hello,

Firstly, sorry for the delay. I had a friend down from Scotland last weekend, so this went on the back burner, but all is back to normal now, so I thought I’d continue through my card and post a few pictures of my wanders. This time, it shows Carew Castle and Tide Mill.

Tide Mill? What’s that? The clue is in the name, it was a mill that ground flour using the power of the tides and stored tidal water. Now long since closed, it is a seasonal museum and a walk for locals that wish to brave the weather the rest of the time. On the occasion I visited, the tide was quite high or at least coming in fairly quickly as you will see. To get to the mill, you need to first go past the Castle.

Carew Castle; it is even imposing now as a ruin

Carew Castle; it is even imposing now as a ruin

According to Mr Wikipedia, a site of military use has existed here for at least 2000 years but the castle we see in the pictures dates from around 1100 AD and was occupied until the late 1600s when it was abandoned and taken on for restoration in the late 1980s; it’s now run as a visitor attraction by the Park Authority.

I'd like to say I was thinking of adding some winter foliage, but it was just a knackered old tree with some red berries on!

I’d like to say I was thinking of adding some winter foliage, but it was just a knackered old tree with some red berries on!

The mill is quite unique, one of only four intact in the UK and the only intact one in Wales. As I said, the day I was here, the tide was quite high and apparently when full, the 22 acres of the tidal pond provide a significant amount of power; this all just drains away now and under some pressure judging by my images!

Such a shame that all this power in the water goes to waste. Funny how things come full circle though isn't it, this kind of power is very fashionable now

Such a shame that all this power in the water goes to waste. Funny how things come full circle though isn’t it, this kind of power is very fashionable now

Once at the mill, the path follows up to a small bridge which now carries a single track road, although I couldn’t get there and take a different aspect of the castle, as it had been flooded and I was wearing trainers! Never mind.

From the flood gate and draining away into the Cleddau Estuary...think of the bread all that water could have made

From the flood gate and draining away into the Cleddau Estuary…think of the bread all that water could have made

As an aside, some of you may be interested in a ghost story about this place;

In the 17th century the castle’s lord, Sir Roland Rees, a former pirate captain, is alleged to have kept a Barbary Ape, most likely a mandrill, inside the castle. Rees had acquired the creature on one of his many voyages. Rees was a very ill-tempered and mannered individual, and would host banquets at the castle just to shout insults and laugh at his guests. The ape, whom he named Satan, would mimic him and laugh at the guests too.

One stormy night, when there was strong wind and rain, the ape grew restless while Rees drank heavily in the dining hall. There was a knock at the door and a tradesman appeared to deliver his rent, but had only half the money needed. Rees was already upset at the man because he did not approve of his son’s relationship with the man’s daughter. In a drunken rage, Rees loosened the ape’s chains and goaded it to maul the tradesman close to death. The tradesman escaped but, weak through loss of blood and struggling to make his way out, collapsed in semi-consciousness.

The tradesman was rescued by a benevolent servant who tended to his wounds and hid him away in his quarters, intending to let him go when the violent storm passed. As the two men talked a violent cry and mad laughter was heard coming from the dining hall. They rushed to the scene to find Sir Rees dead on the floor, his throat gashed open, and the ape burning in the fireplace. The ghosts of the ape and its master are said to haunt the castle to this day. Footsteps are reported regularly, objects throw themselves, and the mad cackling laughter of an ape echoes through the halls.

Oooooh, spooky! Just to say that I have visited inside and I haven’t heard any mad apes, so don’t let this put you off if you fancy dropping in! Next post in a week or so as per normal.

Thanks for stopping by.

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